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    Logan University
   
 
  Oct 23, 2017
 
 
    
2017 Fall Academic Catalog

Doctor of Chiropractic Degree Program


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The Mission

Logan College of Chiropractic prepares students to become Doctors of Chiropractic who are superbly educated and clinically competent practicing portal-of entry chiropractic physicians. This mission is accomplished through our dedicated faculty recognized for student centered excellence; comprehensive science-driven, knowledge-based, and information-facilitated curriculum; enhanced by community and public service. The institution is committed to the conduct of research and other scholarly activities.

Evidence-Informed, Outcome-Based Curriculum

Year 1

  • Students begin their studies in chiropractic by obtaining an understanding of science through basic foundational classes such as anatomy, biochemistry and physiology.
  • Students lay the foundation for chiropractic knowledge by taking classes such as principles of chiropractic and fundamentals of diagnostic imaging.
  • Students engage in hands-on, faculty-guided, clinical methods training to integrate classroom learning with real world applications.

 

Reporter Block-Trimesters 1-2-3

Students are expected to function at a Reporter level on low complexity cases and show adequate knowledge and basic skills to perform fundamental tasks. In addition, students should have core attributes of honesty, reliability and commitment. Students should be able to:

  • Gather past and present information about their patients
  • Perform a basic physical examination
  • Perform a basic evaluation of the spine
  • Use appropriate and accurate terminology to communicate their findings orally and in writing
  • Interact professionally with patients and faculty and demonstrate knowledge of ethical principles and health care laws
  • Consistently and reliably carry out responsibilities

 

Year 2

  • Students continue to build on knowledge acquired in Year 1.
  • Students build on their science foundation by taking courses such as neurological disorders, applied physiology and internal disorders.
  • Students continue to build on their knowledge of chiropractic by taking classes such as diagnosis and patient management, nutrition and physical rehabilitation.
  • Students also incorporate classes such as accounting and finance for health care, statistics for health care and professional ethics to ensure they are practice-ready upon graduation.

 

Interpreter Block-trimesters 4-5-6

Students are expected to function at an Interpreter level on low complexity cases and show a greater knowledge base, increased confidence and skill in selecting and communicating clinical facts to a patient. In addition, students should have the ability to pose clinical questions as well as organize, prioritize and interpret problems. Students should be able to:

  • Identify and prioritize problems independently using a variety of clinical tools
  • Offer three reasonable explanations for new problems
  • Generate and defend a differential diagnosis supported by information gathered

 

Year 3

  • Students continue to focus on building their clinical understanding by taking more advanced courses such as clinical psychology and dermatology.
  • Clinical skills are the focus as students spend a vast amount of their time on clinical rotations.

 

Manager Block-trimesters 7-8-9-10

Students are expected to graduate at a Manager level on moderately complex cases. Managers understand their patients’ needs and can enter into relationship-centered care. Students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to be proactive recommending diagnostic and therapeutic plans appropriate for each patient
  • Determine the need for emergency care, referral and collaborative care
  • Monitor patient progress and ongoing care, altering management plans accordingly

 

Practicing Chiropractor

  • Upon graduation, Logan graduates are competent and confident in their skills and abilities to work a broad variety of patient cases. Graduates also have the experience and knowledge to know when to treat, co-treat or refer patients to other health care professionals.

Health Center Division and Clinical Competencies

A graduate of a Logan College of Chiropractic is competent in the areas of:

I.  ASSESSMENT & DIAGNOSIS (Meta-competency 1)
An assessment and diagnosis requires developed clinical reasoning skills. Clinical reasoning consists of data gathering and interpretation, hypothesis generation and testing, and critical evaluation of diagnostic strategies. It is a dynamic process that occurs before, during, and after the collection of data through history, physical examination, imaging and laboratory tests.

A.    Case history:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the importance of the history in the patient assessment, diagnosis, and management.
  2. Knowledge: The student is able to perform an in depth history that includes the following components:

a.  Investigation of the current complaint.

b.  Inclusion of a review of systems, past health history, family history, and psychosocial history.

c.  Understanding of the patients reasons for seeking care and expectations of the results of care.

  1. Skills: The student is able to elicit an in depth history with compassion, in an organized and efficient manner, and to accurately record the data.

B.     Examination:

  1. Attitude: The student appreciates the importance of a case appropriate examination that includes vitals, physical/organ system, neurological, orthopedic, and biomechanical examinations.
  2. Knowledge: The student selects and performs integrated examination procedures relevant to the patient presentation.
  3. Skills: The student correctly performs the examination procedures with appreciation of the apprehension and possible discomfort of the patient, and accurately records the findings.

C.     Diagnostic studies:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the cost, risks, and benefits of diagnostic studies and makes decisions based on the patient’s best interest.
  2. Knowledge: Following history and examination the student is able to establish the need for additional diagnostic studies, including referral, diagnosis imaging, laboratory, or specialized testing, to obtain further objective clinical data. The student also recognizes the value of external health records and understands the proper procedures for acquiring these records.
  3. Skills: The student orders diagnostic studies and collects clinical data in order to obtain a complete objective clinical picture of the patient.

D.    Diagnosis:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the importance of gathering and integrating all diagnostic studies in order to reach a diagnosis.
  2. Knowledge: The student interprets all available data, including history, examination, and diagnostic procedures, to formulate a diagnosis.
  3. Skills: The student formulates an integrated diagnosis supported by the correlation of all patient data.     

II. MANAGEMENT PLAN (Meta-competency 2)

Management involves the development, implementation and documentation of a patient care plan for positively impacting a patient’s health and well-being, including specific therapeutic goals and prognoses. It may include case follow-up, referral, and/or collaborative care.

A.    Formulating a Management Plan:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the need for establishing an in depth management plan that outlines the proposed treatment, the treatment goals and prognoses, and the patients expectations.
  2. Knowledge: The student demonstrates the understanding of the different elements included in a treatment plan:

a. A multiple phase treatment with short term, intermediate, and long term goals.
b. The value of passive and active care and their timing.
c. The need for changes in patient behavior and activities of daily living.
d. The incorporation of the patient’s values and expectations.
e. The possible need for emergency care, referral, and/or collaborative care.

  1. Skills: The student develops and records a multiple phase management plan appropriate for the diagnosis and the patient health status including treatment options available for each level of care.

B.     Communicating a Management  Plan:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the need for explaining to the patient a multiple phase treatment plan with short term, intermediate, and long term goals, and to present information about the risks, benefits, natural history and alternatives to care regarding the proposed management plan.
  2. Knowledge: The student demonstrates the understanding of the informed consent as it applies to the proposed treatment plan including:

a. Explaining the treatment plan with the different phases, goals, and prognoses for the patient’s presenting complaint and health status.

b. Explaining the benefits, risks, and alternative care available.

c. Obtaining patient consent before initiating care.

  1. Skills:

a. The student effectively delivers and records a comprehensive report of findings, outlining the diagnosis, the management plan and prognosis, the benefits, risks, and alternatives.
b. The student answers patient questions and recognizes and addresses possible apprehensions.
c. The student communicates and documents the need for changes in patient behavior and activities of daily living.
d. The student obtains the patient informed consent.
e. The student communicates the rationale for ongoing care once the patient has reached maximum therapeutic benefits.

C.     Implementing a Management Plan:

  1. Attitude: The student appreciates the importance of adhering to the treatment plan and of closely monitoring the patient in order to revise the plan as circumstances and outcome dictate.
  2. Knowledge:

a. The student understands the concept of therapeutic trial and how it applies to the management plan.
b. The student recognizes the changes of patient status and the point of maximum therapeutic benefits in order to establish and offer a new type of care.

  1. Skills:

a.  The student delivers and documents the management plan.
b.  The student monitors the patient and revises the care as circumstances and outcome dictate.
c.  The student clearly explains and demonstrates the active care identified in the treatment plan.
d.  The student documents the end point of care and the patient communication about ongoing care.

III. HEALTH PROMOTION AND DISEASE PREVENTION (Meta-competency 3)

 Health promotion and disease prevention requires an understanding and application of epidemiological principles regarding the nature and identification of health issues in diverse populations and recognizes the impact of biological, chemical, behavioral, structural, psychosocial and environmental factors on general health.

 A.    Identifying Health Risks :

  1. Attitude: The student appreciates the role of the chiropractor in public health issues.
  2. Knowledge:

a. The student understands epidemiological principles regarding the nature and identification of health issues in diverse populations and recognizes the impact of biological, chemical, behavioral, structural, psychosocial and environmental factors on general health.
b. The student understands Universal Health Precautions in clinical setting.

  1. Skills: The student identifies and documents health risks of the patient and determine areas of potential health improvement.

B.     Formulating a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Plan

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the need for establishing a health promotion and disease prevention plan.
  2. Knowledge:

a. The student demonstrates the understanding of the different elements included in a health promotion and disease prevention plan:

1) Ergonomics, posture, and overall fitness.
2) Nutrition/metabolism.
3) Dependency.
4) Genetic, environmental, behavioral, and psychosocial risk factors reduction.
5) Disease screening.

b.  The student collects resources available to guide the patient in a health improvement plan.

  1. Skills: The student develops and records a health promotion and disease prevention plan appropriate for the patient health status and risk factors.

C.     Communicating, Implementing, and Monitoring  a health Promotion and Disease Prevention Plan

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the need for explaining to the patient the identified areas for health improvement, for encouraging lifestyle changes and preventive measures, for giving choices to the patient, and for monitoring compliance and progress.
  2. Knowledge: The student understands the complexity of coaching patient into a health promotion and disease prevention plan.

a. Presentation of the facts.
b. Giving options.
c. Providing educational material or support structures.
d. Monitoring compliance and progress.
e. Coordinating efforts.

  1. Skills: The student:

a.  Effectively communicates and documents the risks to the patient.
b.  Presents and documents a health promotion and disease prevention plan giving choices to the patient.
c.  Provides, documents, and monitors recommendations regarding patient health status, behavior, and lifestyle.
d.  Provides educational material and resources to encourage the patient to pursue changes.
e.  Inquires about health strategies initiated by other health providers and coordinate improvement efforts.
f.  Applies universal health precautions in a clinical setting.

IV.  COMMUNICATION AND RECORD KEEPING (Meta-competency 4)

 Effective communication includes oral, written and nonverbal skills with appropriate sensitivity, clarity and control for a wide range of healthcare related activities, to include patient care, professional communication, health education, and record keeping and reporting.

 A.    Communication:

  1. Attitude: The student recognizes the importance of proper and effective communication to diverse patient, public, and professional population.
  2. Knowledge: The student understands the different communication styles and the type of information needed in order to communicate effectively, accurately and appropriately, utilizing various communication methods available, with diverse audiences (patients and their relatives, regulatory agencies, third party payers, employers, and other health care professionals).
  3. Skills: The student appropriately, accurately, and effectively communicates with patients, the public, and professional colleagues (as detailed in competencies 1, 2, 3, & 5).

B.     Record Keeping and Reporting:

  1. Attitude: The student understands the importance and value of accurate, complete, concise, legible, patient and business records.
  2. Knowledge: The student knows what information to include in patient records and reports to make them accurate, complete, concise, and in compliance with regulatory requirements.
  3. Skills: The student generates written reports and records that:

    a. Are accurate, complete, concise, and legible.
    b. Document and explain health risks and management options appropriate to patient health care needs and goals.
    c. Safeguard protected patient information.
    d. Comply with regulatory standards and requirements.

V. PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AND JURISPRUDENCE (Meta-competency 5)

Professionals comply with the law and exhibit ethical behavior.

  1. Attitude: The student understands the importance and the value of ethical professional behavior.
  2. Knowledge: The student knows the jurisdictional business, general health care, and chiropractic scope of practice laws, regulations, boundaries, and expectations.
  3. Skills:

a.  The student generates patient records and related information in compliance with all Federal, State, and Municipal requirements.
b. The student maintains all business records in compliance with all Federal, State, and Municipal requirements.
c. The student maintains appropriate professional relationships with the public, patients, staff, and peers.

VI.   INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY LITERACY (Meta-competency 6)

 Information and technology literacy are manifested in an ability to locate, evaluate and integrate research and other types of evidence, including clinical experience, to explain and manage health-related issues and use emerging technologies appropriately.

  1. Attitude:

a. The student understands the importance and the value of maintaining a contemporary knowledge base of health care information to guide and support patient management decision.
b. The student appreciates the value of contemporary technologies in keeping an updated knowledge base.

  1. Knowledge: The student is able to critically appraise emerging information and to integrate this information to existing knowledge base.
  2. Skills:

a. The student critically appraises available information for value and usefulness in patient care and other professional activities.
b. The student incorporates valid information in patient management.
c. The student utilizes contemporary techniques to acquire new information.

VII.  INTELLECTUAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Meta-competency 7)

Intellectual and professional development is characterized by maturing values and skills in clinical practice; the seeking and application of new knowledge; and the ability to adapt to change.

  1. The student continuously seeks knowledge base expansion and enrichment experiences.
  2. The student’s clinical judgment continuously improves throughout the clinic experience with decreasing need from clinician guidance.
  3. The student is able to identify areas where additional knowledge and skills are needed or desired.

The intent of these competencies is to address the minimal acceptable clinical criteria necessary to the conduct of the competent practice of Chiropractic. They identify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes expected of the non-specialist, primary care Doctor of Chiropractic. This skill level is implicit in the first professional degree awarded by a  college holding status with the CCE. They represent those minimal skills a candidate must demonstrate upon completion of the educational program with resident clinical experience in a status-holding institution with CCE.

 

Doctor of Chiropractic Degree Program Requirements

Only students who have satisfied all of the following requirements are eligible to receive a Doctor of Chiropractic Degree from Logan University.

  1. The student must be in good academic standing and must have completed satisfactorily the required course of study as presented at Logan, which consists of 10 trimesters or its equivalent.
  2. The student must have completed a minimum residence of three trimesters of full time enrollment in Logan’s Doctor of Chiropractic Degree Program including the eighth, ninth and tenth trimester Health Center practica, and not less than the final 25 percent of the total credits required for the degree.
  3. The student must have demonstrated satisfactory professional ethics and moral conduct in all phases of student life.
  4. The student must have attained the age of 21 years.
  5. The student must have discharged all financial indebtedness to Logan and received clearance from all departments.
  6. The student must participate in the graduation ceremony. Exceptions to this requirement may be granted only by the Office of the President.

In addition to meeting the required academic and personal standards of Logan, students are expected to participate in special programs, such as all-school assemblies and convocations, presented by the College to expand and enhance the students’ educational experience. Students are also advised to take Parts I, II, III and IV of the examinations given by the National Board of Examiners. All parts of the examination are administered multiple times on the Logan campus (check NBCE exam schedule).

  1. In addition to any other requirements, a student must pass all six components of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Part I examination in order to begin the Trimester 8 outpatient clinic experience.
  2. In addition to any other requirements, a student must pass all six components of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners Part II examination in order to graduate.

Requirements for Licensure for the Doctor of Chiropractic

Logan makes every reasonable effort to qualify its students to sit for all state licensing examinations, but makes no assurance that any graduate will be qualified to take the licensing examination in any particular state or to pass such examination.

State licensing laws and Boards of Examiners’ administrative rules and regulations experience periodic changes. Therefore, each candidate desiring to pursue the professional program offered by Logan is responsible to ascertain all information relative to his or her qualifications to practice in any jurisdiction that he or she selects. The Board of Trustees, officers and faculty cannot be held responsible in this regard. Each licensing board has different requirements. In general, a licensing board may require all or part of the following to be eligible to practice:

  • Proof of graduation from a recognized college of chiropractic.
  • Passage of Parts I, II, III and IV of National Board of Chiropractic Examination.
  • Passage of state board examinations (usually jurisprudence) and proof of professional conduct.
  • Passage of other exams that are required by certain states.

Several state chiropractic boards have professional requirements that are not included in Logan’s minimum entrance requirement, such as a bachelor’s degree prior to chiropractic study.  It is the individual’s responsibility to ascertain and comply with the licensure requirements for any state in which licensure is desired.  This information must be sought directly from state boards of chiropractic to ensure accuracy.

Current files and requirements are maintained in the Learning Resources Center and the Office of the Registrar. A student should review these files and information received directly from the applicable state’s Chiropractic Board for changes before applying to a particular licensing board.

Doctor of Chiropractic Curriculum Tables


The following tables present the time requirements and values of each subject in a student’s education in the Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) degree program at the time of printing of the Academic Catalog. Course descriptions follow in the next section. The curriculum is in a state of continuous, progressive development and therefore the following tables may not be current.

Total Hours:


19 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 4 Contact Hr/Week Lab • 6 Small Group Hours • 435 Contact Hr/Term • 27 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


20 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 4 Contact Hr/Week Lab • 9 Small Group Hours • 495 Contact Hr/Term • 31Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


28 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 3 Contact Hr/Week Lab • 7 Small Group Contact Hours 570 Contact Hr/Term • 36.5 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


25 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 9 Small Group Hours • 510 Contact Hr/Term • 35 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


21 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 1 Contact Hr/Week Lab • 11 Small Group Hr/Week  • 495 Contact Hr/Term • 32.5 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


26 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 12 Small Group Hr/Week 570 Contact Hr/Term • 36 Credit Hr/Term  • 2 Elective Hours

Total Hours:


17 Contact Hr/Week Lec • 3 Small Group Contact Hr/Week   • 225 Clinic Hours • 525 Contact Hr/Term • 22 Credit Hr/Term • 3 Elective hoours

Total Hours:


 21 Contact Hr/Week Lec  • 390 Clinic Hours •  3 Elective hours  •  540 Contact Hr/Term • 21 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


6 Contact Hr/Week Lec •  480 Contact Hr/Term   •  3 Elective Hours • 390 Clinic Contact Hr/Term • 12.5 Credit Hr/Term

Trimester 10


Total Hours:


  3 Contact Hr/Week Lec •  435 Contact Hr/Term • 390 Clinic Contact Hr/Term • 12.5 Credit Hr/Term

Total Hours:


186 Contact Hours Lec  • 12 Contact Hours Lab   •  57 Small Group Hours •  1395 Clinic Hours  • 5055 Contact Hours Program • 266 Credit Hours

Elective


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